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Waldorf Education and Anthroposophy may be unfamiliar subjects, but nonetheless are very pertinent to modern times.

The Society of Homeopaths was honoured to listen to pediatrician Dr Micheala Glöckler at their recent conference in London.

Dr Michaela Glöckner - paediatrician with a deep understanding of Waldorf Education and Anthroposophy
Dr Glöcker

German born Dr Glöckler now lives in Switzerland and has a deep passion for Applied Anthroposophy and the availability of choice and cultural diversity.

Anthroposophy (Anthro-po-sophy) is a philosophical system associated with polymath Dr Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925). The word means human (anthropos) wisdom (sophia).

Steiner had great respect for Dr Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) who documented the principles of Homeopathic Medicine.  Indeed Anthroposophic medicines are low potency homeopathic preparations.  In the UK, Weleda is one well know name in the manufacture of both homeopathic and anthroposophic medicines.

While writing this blog, I found a interesting (but quite long) article comparing Steiner’s work and Homeopathy.

Dr Glöckler spoke with great passion through the morning session, almost without notes, surely challenge enough, without that of speaking in a foreign language.  Gut gemacht!

Waldorf Schools

Waldorf Education follows the Anthroposophy of Rudolf Steiner. The name comes fom the town of Waldorf, a town near Stuttgart.

Wikipedia gives a good overview. Do bear in mind that the Wikipedia perspective is coloured by their philosophy which is not as definitive as they would like you to believe.

Children according to Steiner-Waldorf teaching, learn in three ways: imitation; experience (often painful); and, insight or understanding.  Education should be age appropriate.

Education should also be in the real – not the digital world – and that real world incorporates an awareness of Higher Worlds (i.e. the spiritual). 

Dr Glöckler warned us not to delegate our potential (or consciousness) to the internet; to do so risks delegation to the State and potentially the control the powerful and often negative forces.  

Healthy learning is active (analogue) not passive (digital). Ultimately what we truly understand is self-education. 

She moved on to consider in closer detail a child’s development.  There are three seven year cycles: first (0-7) brain, then emotional (8-14); and finally consciousness and responsibility (15-21).  

As a aside (but relevant) children’s author Michael Morpurgo also had something to say on the value of early years education on the BBC yesterday.

Having been a school governor for almost twenty years, I can say that national curriculums and such like are eternal subjects of debate. The rise in home schooling rather demonstrates the dissatisfaction with a one size fits all view-point.

Anthroposophy in Medicine

All across Europe – and even in land of her birth – mainstream medicine increasingly denies the teachings of Hahnemann and Steiner.  The reason, Dr Glöckler explained, is a failure to understand the working principles.  At the core is a battle of philosophies: the technology focused trans-humanistic view versus the spiritual path. 

Each human being has its unique spiritual destiny which is ignored at our peril.  She urged everyone to campaign for the legal status of integrative medicine (see https://eliant.eu/en/).

Modern medicine, for all its benefits, focuses solely on the physical body. This approach is wonderful in emergency medicine, when life is threatened. However the nature of disease – or better ‘dis-ease’ – is much more complex. Your physical symptoms can have roots in anything from infection, through emotional issues to your genetic inheritance.

The book shown below provides some excellent guidance on how parents and carers can treat illnesses and guide their children.

Waldorf Education and Anthroposophy - Guide to Children's Health

‘Deficitarian’ – The Human as perceived in Waldorf Education and Anthroposophy

Dr Glöckler coined the term ‘deficitarian’, stimulating the ‘little grey cells’ of the audience to action!  

The underlying philosophy of Waldorf Education and Anthroposophy recognises that humans are not perfect by nature; this is both our deficit (hence ‘deficitarian’) and our catalyst to growth.  The ‘deficit’ then, is the gap between what we are and what we must become.  

Life, health and illness extend beyond the domain of modern medicine with its physical / material focus.  Life is neither visible nor material.  Illness may be inconvenient, but it is also a rebalancing process and necessary for long term health (hence a child’s fever is ‘healthy’).  

As humans we live in constant interaction with our environment – from the microcosm (e.g. microbiome) to macrocosm (e.g. cosmos).  A focus on the physical body alone denies the constant interplay between that body (mostly water) with its metabolism (warmth driven), and the immaterial etheric (life force), astral (emotional) and thought processes. Ultimately, we live a life of thoughts. 

Paracelsus – a story

Dr Glöckler retold a story about Paracelsus a notable 16th century Swiss physician. He, together with five other medical men, discuss the cause of death of a man during a cholera epidemic (but substitute any disease you like). In abbreviated form the story goes thus:

The question is, ‘Why did the patient die’?

The first doctor says: ‘It is the [cholera] bacteria that caused the death – obvioulsy the patient died of cholera’

The second doctor responds: ‘As only 10% of those infected from the contaminated water died, you cannot say this. The death could be due to poor natural immunity’.

The third doctor says: ‘Positive feelings strengthen the immune system, and negative weaken. The patient was frustrated in his soul and was not in balance. This is the cause.’

The fourth doctor says: ‘All well and good, but actually the patient’s ego (spiritual identity) was weak, thus his tolerance of frustration was undermined. At the core, this is why he died.’

The fifth doctor then chips in: ‘I looked up the astrological tables; the stars point to a lethal crisis. His life was over, it was his time to die.’

Everyone now looks to Paracelsus, who smiles and says: ‘You are all correct, there are five causes of illness and five ways to health. A good doctor must know all of them equally well and walk with each person the most promising path to healing.’

In this parable, Paracelsus demonstrates the complexity of the human constitution.

Homeopathy

Homeopathy is (w)holistic medicine, its consideration goes much further that the orthodox diagnosis.

The latter has value in determining the trajectory of the ailment and the urgency of intervention. However, all too often the outcome is management of symptoms and a failure to consider the underlying cause.

For this reason the initial homeopathic consultation takes time. Its purpose is to try and reveal the underlying cause and reestablish harmony in the body.

I recall one case when attending the International Academy of Classical Homeopathy in Greece, where a patient’s problems originated some decades in the past. The lady had suffered physical assault from her father or step-father. The college principal, Prof. Vithoulkas, opened with the remedy Arnica – a remedy know for repair of deep bruising. Why? Because the body had held that memory.

If you judge you have never been well since some event in the past, physical or emotional, and would like to find out whether homeopathy might help you, please book a discovery call via my website.

The use of homeopathy for uncomplicated urinary tract infection or UTI is the subject of this article. It is a condition more common in women due to the relatively short urethra (tube from the bladder to the outside). A common name for this type of infection is Cystitis.

Urinary tract infection and retention in men is often secondary to another issue such as prostate problems.

Don't panic - homeopathy can help with a urinary tract infection
© Markus Spiske on Pexel.com

If you follow my blogs you will know that Classical Homeopathy follows the ‘law of similars’. Simply put this means that the characteristics of the ailment as experienced by the patient must match the ‘picture’ of the homeopathic medicine / remedy.

The typical UTI ‘picture’ is common; most often a burning pain when having a ‘wee’.

Homeopathic First Aid for Urinary Tract Infections

Continuing with this series on useful remedies in a home first aid kit, in this blog I focus on those homeopathy kit remedies that have a particular affinity for urinary tract infection. For more on the benefits of purchasing a first aid kit of basic homeopathic remedies see my earlier blog Family Care with Homeopathy

homeopathic first aid kit contains remedies for a urinary tract infection

Classical homeopathic prescribing for acute complaints considers the following:

  1. Causation (commonly bacteria)
  2. Location (urethra and bladder but can extend back to the kidneys)
  3. Modalities (things that make the complaint better or worse – e.g. hot or cold)
  4. Sensation (for example the nature of any discharge – e.g. cloudy or smelly urine)
  5. Concomitants (characteristics that may seem unrelated – e.g. how you feel generally)

Consider homeopathic treatment like finding the right key for a lock, if after a taking the remedy for a short while* there is no response, then try another.

*A simple approach is to place one pill of the remedy selected from the first aid kit into your half litre water bottle and shake well. Sip this on and off through the day.

Remember that homeopathic medicines are absorbed through the mucous membranes of the mouth. You let the pill dissolve under the tongue or in water swish briefly round the mouth before swallowing.

If there is fever, lower back pain or a general unwell feeling, there may be a deeper seated infection.

This warrants a visit to your GP to rule out anything more serious. He/she can arrange a urine analysis and prescribe antibiotics if necessary. While waiting for an appointment trying one or two of the remedies described below is worthwhile.

Urinary Tract Infection: what is it?

In his book, The Family Guide to Homeopathy, Dr Andrew Lockie says the term Cystitis is used rather loosely.

Cystitis proper, is an inflammation that can extend along the whole urinary tract from kidney, through bladder to urethra This usually results from E.Coli bacteria transferred from the bowel (more easily caused in female anatomy).

the bacteria E.coli is the common cause of a urinary tract infection

Then there is Urethritis which is an inflammation of the urethra itself.

Finally, there is Urethral Syndrome, a slightly ambiguous term. Here causation is less clear and bacteria are not considered the underlying cause.

Principal Homeopathic First Aid Remedies for Urinary Tract Infection

Ainsworths (see above) and Helios sell first aid kits that contain several useful remedies.

By the way, looked after (keep in a cool place away from strong sun and heat) remedies will keep for ten years or more. The use-by date is purely a regulatory requirement.

Listed below are some remedies typically found in homeopathy that should address urinary tract infection.

The characteristic burning pain is common to most, so some trial and error may be necessary to find the remedy that best works for you. Try and think holistically – that is to say the combined mental / emotional and physical nature of the patient.

Cantharis

The No1 remedy to try. Severe, burning, cutting pains in the lower abdomen (neck of bladder). Cloudy dark urine . Non stop urge to urinate and an inability to empty the bladder properly.

Apis (bee)

Similar to Cantharis as regards the urinary symptoms. Stinging pains – last drops burn and smart. Symptoms worse for heat. Apis personalities tend to be thirstless, cannot think clearly, are fidgety, tearful, whining and cannot tolerate heat. Think of how one reacts to a bee sting.

Argentum Nitricum

Pain extends from kidney to bladder. Urethra feels as if swollen. Also resembles Cantharis and should be tried instead if there is no improvement. Arg.nit types love sweets, can be impulsive and have a way with words (‘silver’ tongue. Argent=silver).

Arsenicum

Another remedy associated with ‘burning pains’. A major remedy in homeopathy systemically, meaning that there is general malaise (it is valuable for many aliments from skin, to food poisoning to asthma).

The patient is chilly, restless yet easily exhausted. The bladder may feel as if paralysed (so urine scanty). The remedy has a curious modality in that symptoms worsen after midnight.

Belladonna

Another major systemic remedy in homeopathy. Urine retention, and scanty yet constant urge. Involuntary passage. With Belladonna the patient is always hot (contrasting the chilly Arsenicum) and potentially delirious. There may be spasm and cramp-like pains which come and go.

Causticum

Frequent urge to pass urine, which produces nothing (paralysis of the bladder). Then involutary passage or urine made worse with cough or sneeze. Itching around urethral opening, perhaps with vaginal discharge.

Staphisagria

Attack comes on after sexual intercourse or after catheterisation for an operation. Burning sensation almost constant, even when not urinating.

Other self-help measures

Dr Lockie advises increasing fluid intake to 3 litres daily until urine is the normal colour and there is no discomfort. Cut down or cut out tea and coffee.

As acidity is the cause of the burning, you should try and make your urine more alkaline. He suggests taking a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda in water twice a day.

Citrus fruits are acid and aggravate. He also notes that potatoes, tomatoes, beetroot, raw carrots, asparagus and strawberries are also problematic.

The herbal products from Vogel have been around a long time, and may also help. You may will probably be aware of the benefits of cranberry juice and possibly D-mannose.

If you are prone to urinary tract infections, then constitutional homeopathic treatment can help. If you wish to discuss this then please book a free 30 minute discovery call from my website.

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Are there homeopathic remedies for a sore throat? Indeed there are. If you follow this blog you will know that Classical Homeopathy follows the ‘law of similars’. Simply put this means that the characteristics of the ailment as experienced by the patient must match the ‘picture’ of the remedy (homeopathic medicine).

Many homeopathic remedies have a sore throat ‘picture’. Fortunately, there is overlap between the various remedies such that absolute precision is not required.

Homeopathic First Aid

Continuing with the series on remedies in a typical home first aid kit, in this blog I focus on kit remedies that have a particular affinity to sore throats. For more on the benefits of purchasing a first aid kit of basic homeopathic remedies see my earlier blog Family Care with Homeopathy

homeopathic first aid kit

Classical homeopathic prescribing for acute complaints considers the following:

  1. Causation (for example, getting wet or chilled)
  2. Location (obviously your throat but see point 5.)
  3. Modalities (things that make the complaint better or worse)
  4. Sensation (for example the nature of pain)
  5. Concomitants (characteristics that may seem unrelated – e.g. how you feel generally)

What is a Sore Throat

A sore throat is a blanket term for inflammation or infection affecting the tissues of the throat. Typically affecting the tonsils and adenoids. These specialised tissues are part of the immune system which guard the airway (Pharnyx). Sometimes there is a loss of voice if the infection spreads to vocal box/chords (Larynx) located below the Pharnyx. The diagnosis reflects the location, hence Tonsilitis, Pharyngitis, and Laryngitis.

The offending microbe is often a virus, but it can be a bacterium (hence “Strep” throat).

Wikipedia gives a good overview on the orthodox treatment of tonsilitis.

The typical symptons of pain on swallowing, swollen tonsils, a dry throat and possibly fever are doubtless familiar. The formation of an abcess behind a tonsil is known as Quinsy and is particulary unpleasant and may make jaw movement painful.

Most sore throats self-resolve in a week or so. A course of antibiotics is the orthodox treatment (where the cause is bacterial) and should always be considered in urgent cases. If there is severe pain with significant difficulty swallowing or difficulty breathing NHS guidance is to go to A&E.

However, a well selected homeopathic medicine can usually reduce the duration of any infection.

By the Way..

By the way, it is perfectly possible and appropriate to take homeopathic medicines alongside orthodox treatment. Homeopathic medicines function in a different way to antibiotics or analgesics (pain killers). There is no conflict and in this context they are indeed complementary.

Homeopathic medicines are neither antibiotic or antiviral in the conventional sense. Rather they stimulate the immune system of the body to overcome the infection.

We need to be midful of antibiotic resistance and use our antibiotics appropriately.

Recurring Throat Infections

If you suffer from recurring throat infections, this is probably a sign that your body is struggling to restore and maintain good health.  Professional homeopathic care can assist your body’s own defences, increasing resilience and breaking the cycle of repeated infections.  In homeopathy we call this Constitutional Treatment.

If you want to discuss this further, you can book a free 30 minute discovery call with me here.

Common Homeopathic Remedies for Sore Throats

Described below are ten of the homeopathic remedies useful in sore throats which you will find in most homeopathic first aid kits. The one which will engage your body’s healing process is the one which most closely matches your specific symptoms.

Consider every homeopathic medicine a ‘key’. If it fits the ‘lock’ you will get some improvement in a couple of hours. Falling asleep is a good sign of healing taking place.

If there is no improvement, there is no harm whatsoever in trying another remedy. As sore throats share characteristics, matching the general characteristics of the remedy may best aid selection.

The first three (Aconite, Belladonna and Apis) I have written about before in more general terms.

Aconite and Belladonna (plants)

These two remedies are similar – yet different. Both can have an associated with high fever.

Aconite is often the remedy to give in the early stages of infection when the onset of symptoms is sudden. A typical cause if becoming chilled when hot.

The general characteristics of Aconite are fear, restlessness and anxiety.

The onset of symptoms is sudden; within just a few hours of exposure to the cause. The throat, it is dry, very red and constricted. Cold drinks bring some relief. There is an initial affinity for the left side (e.g. left tonsil).

The general characteristics of Belladonna are heat, redness, throbbing and burning. In a word violence. Children have high vitality which means that their immune systems respond accordingly (i.e. violently!). Belladonna is a ‘must have’ children’s remedy.

The onset of symptoms is somewhat slower than that for Aconite. Though hot, the patient feels chilly and wants to be covered (‘Aconite’ prefers the cool air).

There is anger / irritability and the affinity is for the right side (contrasting Aconite). The patient is not so thirsty but may take small sips of water (lemon flavour appeals) to ease the dry throat and the continual desire to swallow.

Apis (animal)

Apis is a homeopathic medicine made from the venom of the bee.

The general characteristics of Apis match with the effects of a bee sting: burning-stinging pain and swelling.

This is a medicine for highly inflamed and swollen tonsils, perhaps with ulceration.  Swallowing is difficult. Patients are not especially thirsty but sucking ice cubes may help. This patient is restless (think ‘busy bee’).

p.s. It is also a useful medicine in urinary tract infections (along with Cantharis)

Bryonia (plant)

The general characteristics of Bryonia are dyness (‘DRY-BRY’), great thirst, worse for movement and better for rest. The Bryonia patient can be irritable.

The onset of illness in the Bryonia patient is slower. Perhaps 24 or 48 hours after exposure to the cause, which may be damp or autumn weather (hot days / cold nights).

This slower onset reflects the lower vitality of the patient. Where the Belladonna picture often matches the child, Bryonia is more suited to the adult. Soon there is much catarrh. Compared to Aconite, Belladonna and Apis the throat has a duller hue.

Gelsemium (plant)

The general characteristics of Gelsemium are dizziness, drowsiness and dullness. A state of apathy and weakness (‘Worn-out’).

These characteristics often match the influenza picture. Again the onset is slower. The tonsils are red and swallowing is difficult due to muscular weakness. There is itching in the palate and nose and a sense of a lump in the throat. The voice may be weak either from the nervous state or catarrh.

(p.s. My son at about age 4 – now 34! – responded almost instantly to this remedy. I had previously tried Belladonna to nil effect and was on the cusp of calling the doctor.)

Hepar Sulphuris (mineral)

The general characteristics of Hepar Sulphuris are suppuration and hyper-sensitivity (cannot bear the affected part to be touched). This is reflected in the impulsive mental state (‘touchy’).

This is a remedy where the tonsils and glands are swollen, possibly with pus and the throat feels constricted.  There is a very typical sharp, stitching, splinter-like pain in the throat (described as a stuck fishbone or like swallowing broken glass), which often affects the ears when swallowing.  The throat is sensitive to touch and cold. The symptoms are relieved by hot drinks.

Lachesis (animal)

The general characteristics of Lachesis (from a snake venom) are loquacity (talks constantly), suspicion and again great sensitivity to touch. The collar must be very loose.

This is a remedy for Quinsy with ulcerated tonsils. The throat of the Lachesis patient is dry and has a purplish colour. The onset of symptoms is on the left side and the pain extends up into the ear. There is an inability to swallow and a curious feature that liquids cause more difficulty in swallowing than solids. Another curiosity is that symptoms tend to worsen after sleep.

Mercurius Solubilis (mineral)

The general characteristics of Merc.sol. (as typically abbreviated) are seen in the metal of the same name; the only metal that is liquid at room temperature. It reacts to temperature (mercury thermometer) and is generally unstable (trembling).

This is another remedy for Quinsy. The sore throat requiring this medicine is putrid, swollen bluish-red, perhaps with ulceration and pus. Despite the pain, saliva must be swallowed. There is a metallic taste in the mouth. Much perspiration is another feature.

Lycopodium (plant)

The general characteristics of Lycopodium are careful, cautious, conscientious. There is apprehension with a certain lack of confidence, and a tendency to digestive troubles and flatulence.

Lycopodium throats tend to begin on the right side with swelling, suppuration and ulceration (which can affect the voice). There may be sensation of a ball in the throat. The patient is better for warm drinks.

Silica (mineral)

The general characteristics of Silica are a yielding nature, with weakness and poor assimilation of nutrients. Ulceration with poor healing may result. There is great sensitivity, anxiety and touchiness.

This is a remedy for a severe type of tonsilitis where swallowing is very difficut, causing a cough. Abcesses may form yet not suppurate, ot not heal. There is a left sided affinity. The patient is chilly but desires cold food. It is a remedy that is complementary to Hepar. sulph and Merc.sol and may follow these medicines where the symptoms have not fully resolved.

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If you regularly suffer from sore throats (or have one now that is not resolving) and wish to see if homeopathy can assist, please contact me here

This blog is about remembering the past and specifically the benefits of homeopathy.

The thing is we do forget. The eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month is soon upon us and it serves indeed as a reminder of past conflicts.

But I suspect for most youngsters the two world wars might as well be the Battle of Hastings or Waterloo, though surviving film footage does resonate across time. My late father served in the western desert and Italy in WW2. Were he alive he would be now 106!

By Eric Hill from Boston, MA, USA – Poppies in the Sunset on Lake GenevaUploaded by PDTillman, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6910646

Not just conflict

Of course it is not just about conflicts distant in time. I read this weekend the report of a recent train derailment (2001) in Scotland, fortunately without casualties. The investigators found that it had much in common with the 1988 Clapham rail disaster (wiring error) which cost the lives of 35 people.

The late Trevor Kletz, whom I once met in my Chemical Engineering days, wrote many books on the theme of “What went wrong” – to quote one title. It had a sequel, “Still going wrong”, reminding readers of the shortnes of corporate memory.

I recall him quoting a boy on the radio who notably said that “he didn’t have a memory only a ‘forgett-ory'”. Quite.

Alas, we forget the past and consequences follow.

Bury the past…

Not all amnesia is entirely accidental. All too often the past is denied; inconvenient truths and wisdom brushed aside. The reasons are mixed, there may be gain (corporate or personal), or maybe just a biased manner of thinking.

Influencers … the benefits of homeopathy overlooked

Just over a century ago John D Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie were the equivalent of today’s Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and more. Through their wealth they funded various charitable foundations that had great influence.

I don’t wish to say that they were bad people. Carnegie, whose humble beginnings were in Dunfermline, Scotland funded many public libraries throughout that land and beyond (the link opens with a picture of my local library in Rutherglen, where I was born).

However, what the poweful have is influence to move society in the direction they believe is best. In this towards what we know as western scientific medicine or allopathy (not that homeopathy is unscientific – anything but).

Enter Abraham Flexner

The gentleman was an a academic engaged by the aformentioned to look into medical training in the USA.

Here is a nice summary of his contribution.

Medicine is generally recognised as a balance between art and science. Science today is solely focused on the material world, a subject I have touched on before. However, human beings are more than a bundle of molecules.

There is a growing concern today that the application of science is too narrow and you may care to read the Galileo Report of the Scientific and Medical Network.

Exit Dr Samuel Hahnemann…who?

The picture below is of a monument located in the centre of Washington D.C. The first monument in that city to a non-US citizen (he was German). Who was this man to get such a grand monument?

Carol M. Highsmith, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Hahnemann (1755-1843) is considered the founding father of homeopathy. A scientist before the term was in general use and polymath (he knew many languages). His medical work was of huge significance. Here is a short summary from the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. Yet you wont find mention of him in western medical schools today.

Homeopathy was a major force in America at the start of the twentieth century. It’s demise stems from the influence of Abraham Flexner and his sponsors.

Medicine was set a path to that which we see today. There have been many benefits, but all in the garden is not rosy as the burden of prescription costs to the NHS might attest.

Back to the future..

I suggest – well obviously I would! – that we need to look again not just at homeopathy, but naturopathic, and medicine in all its forms practiced throughout the world.

Medical science today is too narrow in its application and the ‘art’ has all but disappeared (though many physicians still recognise the art in what they do).

Seminal Work

Hahnemann’s seminal work is the Organon of Medicine, which is still in print. The opening aphorisms shown below speak to us through time. The rest is not bad either – actually, very profound.

Aphorism 1: The physician’s highest calling, his only calling, is to make sick people healthy – to heal as it is termed.

Aphorism 2: The highest ideal of therapy is to restore health rapidly, gently, permanently; to remove and destroy the whole disease in the shortest, surest, least harmful way, according to clearly comprehensible principles.

Dr Samuel Hahnemann, Organon of Medicine

It was concerning to read about the quantity of pharma drugs in rivers today. This article considers the consequences and alternatives.

Pharma Drugs in Rivers – Time to Clean-up?

Our rivers once polluted by industry are now full of pharma drug residue

Back in February The Week published the following short article:

Pharmaceutical pollution is contaminating the rivers on every continent, a major study has shown. Scientists at the University of York measured the levels of 61 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in 258 rivers around the world, including the Thames and the Amazon.

Just two areas had unpolluted waters: Iceland and a part of Venezuala whose indigenous inhabitants don’t use modern medicine. The most common APIs were an anti-epileptic drug called carbamazine and the diabetes drug Metformin, along with paracetamol, antibiotics and caffeine.

Potentially toxic levels of drugs were in a quarter of the sites, and the highest being in low-to-middle income countries such as India and Nigeria – possibly because their populations have encough money to by drugs but may live in areas without good sewage infrastructure.

The most contaminated site in the UK was the River Clyde in Glasgow.

The study, published in the journal Procedings of the National Academy of Sciences, warned that pharmaceutical pollution poses a risk to wildlife, and could also contribute more to antimicrobial resistance in humans.

The Week 26th Feb 2022

Previously on a BBC science programme I heard that the equivalent of 200 pills of Metformin pass under the bridges of the Thames every hour. Even the apparently pristine River Dee in Royal Deeside carries a significant pharmaceutical burden as this report shows. Hopefully the famous Deeside Water – highly regarded for its purity – is sourced well upstream!

Pharma Drugs

The NHS Health Survey for England 2016 states that nearly half of adults had taken one prescribed medicine in the last week and 24 percent had taken three or more. The total cost at list price of prescriptions dispensed in the community in 2016 was just short of £10 billion. It is not an improving situation.

None doubt the value of medicines, but health impact both on the individual and the enviromnment of long-term use is a matter worthy of discussion.

Brave New World

For the first time since school days I read again Aldous Huxley’s dystopian novel Brave New World written in the 1930s. His vision was one where the highs and lows of human existence were under the control of a world state. With remarkable prescience Huxley foresaw the path we are on today. Elsewhere he remarked, “Medical science has made such tremendous progress that there is hardly a healthy human left”. I dare say there is a degree of overstatement here, but he had a point nonetheless.

It is a subject I indirectly blogged on previously

Health

What is health? That is the question. During the first lockdown of the pandemic I cycled out into the New Forest and visited a couple of Churchyards. I was struck by the longevity even in an age of no medical care.

It made me think about the late Jan de Vries, a remarkable naturopath who ran a clinic on the west coast of Scotland until his death in 2015. He wrote many books amongst them 10 Golden Rules for Good Health. Attention to these basic principles would do much to reduce the burden on the NHS not to mention the individual.

I do not underestimate the challenge: a very rural 19th century New Forest is very different from modern city life.

Homeopathy plus

Homeopathy, osteopathy, naturopathy and other forms of so-called Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) all seek to maintain the human organism in balance.

They are not always quick fixes. The saying “a stich in time saves nine” is very true – the longer things are our of balance the longer it takes to correct.

Sadly, CAM has been marginalised in the health service. Some argue that such approaches do not work and waste money. Yet, the long term cost of the current medical model is problematic.

Time for a rethink?

coughs and sneezes

Atishoo – ’Tis the season (for colds and flu)

Here are some ideas for self help with colds and flu. And little about homeopathy which can help too.

I caught a cold last week – in common with many others, it seems.  Well, it is that time of year. Pre-pandemic, colds and flu were not newsworthy – but they are now.  I shall not labour the point, but the media doom and gloom is not particularly helpful.

As we have all learned during these past months, respiratory infections are caused by viruses and viruses that tend to mutate. 

The characteristics of the various offending bugs we can leave to the scientists, but when it comes to the counter attack, respiratory viruses seem to be rather slippery characters.

Fortunately most respiratory infections are self limiting – even Covid.  Being sensible makes a significant difference to the outcome.

So what are the tips for self help with colds and flu?  And what should we not do?

Prevention is better than cure

I just penned a short editorial for the The Herald (issue 414 p38).  What could be said in 300 words is limited, but I emphasised the importance of good general health in building immunity.  

Modern life with its cities and technologies is about as distant from the natural world as you can get. One of the gains from the environmental movement is a reawakening to that lost connection.  

Here are three simple steps to reconnect:

Firstly, get a good night’s sleep.  As the hours of daylight shorten, you don’t need to be a genius to infer that this is suggestive of more sleep. Sleep is a health regenerating process and a lack of sleep increases our vulnerability to infection.

Secondly, consider your eating habits.  Eating may be pleasurable, but its real purpose is to supply the body with the necessary nutrients.  The gut flora is known to be important in immune health. It is common sense then to focus on healthy fresh food.  

Thirdly, get outside into the sunlight as much as you can.  Living by the New Forest and the coast, there are plenty of options.  Not only is exercise good for the body, it is good for the mind also.

The sunshine vitamin

Whilst nutrition should be the main source of vitamins and minerals, there is a logic to vitamin D (specifically vitamin D3) supplementation during the winter months.

Otherwise known as the sunshine vitamin, it is made by the action of sunlight on the skin.  Reduced daylight and overcast weather mean that vitamin D deficiency is common in winter.

Vitamin D has many functions which you can look up online, but of particular relevance is its role in maintaining respiratory health. It is generally anti-inflammatory.

Daily supplementation in the range of 2000 to 4000 IU (international units) or 50 to 100 micrograms should be perfectly safe for adults (half the dose for under 12s). 

Start low and increase as winter progresses, then tail off again as the days lengthen.  As ever, take advice if you have particular health conditions.

Theoretically excess vitamin D can be toxic (elevated calcium levels and intestinal symptoms) but such events require massive doses over extended periods.   In short, sensible supplementation is safe.

The supplement is mostly available as tablets or capsule of 1000 to 2000 IU tablets which is itself a guide to dosage.

You may recall a time when Mums gave cod-liver oil to her school age kids? Guess what, it is Vitamin D rich. Two teaspoons is about 1000IU

Here is a selection of articles / videos. The NHS dosage guidelines (just 400IU) seem to be rather conservative.

NHS Vitamin D  Healthline Vitamin D  Dr Seheult Medcram  John Campbell PhD Epidemic Influenza and Vitamin D

Sometimes, you just get sick…

Tips for self help with colds and flu

We all do, and it may even be necessary that we do so in order to keep the immune system in trim.  Or it could be a reminder to slow down, and metaphorically ‘recharge the batteries’.

So, here are the tips for self-help with cold and flu. What should you do?   Or not to do?

In short:

What not to do…

When we get a cold it is popular to reach for over the counter medicines most of which contain Paracetamol or aspirin (pain / fever relief),  and other ingredients like Pseudoephedrine (decongestant) that relieve your symptoms

Strange as it may seem, your symptoms are your body’s curative reaction to the virus.  Unpleasant, these may be, but they have a purpose.  Fever, for example, stimulates the immune system into action.  

Here is a short quote from Dr Russell Malcolm a medical doctor and homeopath in Scotland:

“avoid Paracetamol and Aspirin completely …. [they] have no curative power at all … there is evidence that interfering with this process can lengthen the illness and increase the incidence of complications.”  

What to do?  Old wisdom…

A great book on building immunity in children
Wisdom

On my bookshelf is a small volume that I bought when my son was a baby 30 years back – in the chapter on respiratory infections, sore throats, colds and flu the author (American, Dr Leo Galland MD), puts it simply:

I recommend rest, chicken soup and TLC (tender loving care).  For severe infections with fever, lots of aches and/or uncomfortable congestion, I find short megadose therapy of vitamin C helpful.

I’ll come back to vitamin C shortly.

Cold or Flu

Dr Malcolm also states “Flu is not a headcold”. As the old joke says, if a £50 note blows into the garden when you have a headcold, you’ll wrap-up and go out to catch it, with flu you surely will not!

Half a century earlier, Dr Dorothy Shepherd (1888-1952) said this:

It is the fashion to call every slight feverish chill influenza; but if after the temperature has come down, the depression, exhaustion and weariness is such that it is too much effort to do anything, that life is really not worth living, you know you will have had influenza; after a mere feverish chill you will feel as well on getting up as you did before the attack.  

Unfortunately many people take no notice of the danger signals of weakness and prostration, and insist on getting up, even returning to work before they are fit, thus laying themselves open to broncho-pneumoniaand sudden death’  

‘During the feverish period the patient should be allowed  nothing but raw fruit and fruit juices, and not synthetic bottled juices.  Fresh oranges, lemon juice, apple drinks, grapefruit drinks at frequent intervals will cleans the system and prevent any undue strain being thrown on the gastric organs.  No meat juices, no milk, are permissible.  After the temperature is down, the diet may be increased and may include vegetable broth, Yeastrel drinks ( Marmite?), wholemeal toast. Gradually other foods may be added…

No.1 rule then is REST.   You may recall what happened to PM Boris Johnson when he tried to keep going through his Covid infection … viruses don’t respecter rank!

Modern society tends not to permit absence from work or school, which is a pity and probably counter productive …Covid, might remind us of old wisdom.

Megadose Vitamin C

Vitamin C has a direct anti-viral effect that has been well researched.  

Dr Leo Galland mentioned above, continued: 

Vitamin C and D are excellent self help for treating colds and flu
Essential
Vitamin C

To treat severe colds, viral infection such as sore throats or bronchitis, and flu, I find megadoses of vitamin C very effective…I recommend the highest dose you [or your child] can take.  1000mg an hour, until he begins to get loose bowels (Excess vitamin C…draws water into the intestines).  This will establish [the] saturation point.  

Stop the vitamin C until the next day, when you [or your child] should  [take] 1000mg every 2-3 hours until the bowels become loose.  Stop the vitamins again until the third day, when you should give 1000mg every four to six hours.  Maintain this dose until the cold is over, then gradually cut the dose back over two weeks to 1000mg a day.

The anti-viral effect of vitamin C depends on getting the highest level possible into the tissues.  

Is it safe?  Very: not only against viruses but also acute allergic reactions.  When should you not give vitamin C? If you [your child] has kidney disease or is too sick to take food and liquid along with it.

This is the protocol I follow myself.  Loose bowels do not result in my case, but they may for you, everyone is different.

Also to consider

Zinc has a important function in supporting immune health. A healthy diet should suffice for daily needs, but supplemention at 20-40mg per day when you are sick can be helpful.

The herbal remedy Echinacea can also help on first signs of a cold or flu. But Echinacea should be taken for only a few days (say a week) as thereafter it can be counter productive. Follow the manufacturers guidance on dosage.

Homeopathy.

Most respiratory infections are self limiting and are more likely to be so, if you follow the good advice above. Homeopathic medicine can undoubtably speed recovery but selection of the correct remedy takes a little skill, but can be learned. First aid kits are available for home use.

Should you have a viral respiratory illness that is lingering on uncomfortably, and wish to try a homeopathic approach please call and leave a message or text (see Contact) and I will call back – the ‘Discovery Call’ arrangement is for clients with longer term issues. (Expect a nominal charge of around £10 for any remedy sent).

However – and very importantly – seek immediate medical help (GP or A&E) if your condition is getting worse and especially if you have breathing difficulties.

Knowing your onions!

Isn’t this a fantastic looking flower? It is an ornamental hybrid of the common onion from which the homeopathic remedy Allium Cepa derives.

homeopathic Allium Cepa can help with hay fever
Ornamental Allium – from the onion family and the source of the homeopathic medicine Allium Cepa

The name which may derive from two Celtic words “all” and “cep”, meaning “hot” and “head”. In full bloom the flower is indeed like a head – a big beautiful sphere.

The onion family includes garlic and leeks. Plants used nutritionally and medicinally for centuries. Today the medicinal benefits are still recognised – here is one article – read more

ALLIUM CEPA IN FOLKLORE

In folklore, even in the 19th century, placing sliced onions around the home, or in a bag worn around the neck was considered to protect against contagion during epidemics.

Perhaps we should revisit past wisdom, given the current (Covid) challenges? But I suspect sending your children back to school with a bag of chopped onions around their neck might not be popular?

HOMEOPATHIC ALLIUM CEPA – INFORMATIONAL MEDICINE

When chopping onions for the cooking pot streaming eyes and runny nose is all too familiar! This is “coryza” or “rhinitis” in medical parlance.

As a homeopathic medicine, one paarticular use of Allium Cepa is in the treatment of an attack of “hay fever”, whose symptoms of coryza, as you all know, are rather similar to those from chopping onions. The nasal discharge is acrid and that from the eye bland.

The homeopathic core principle is “like cures like”. This means giving a medicine that mimics the symptoms suffered.

Homeopathy supports the body’s attempt to cure. It helps it over “the hill” that needs to be climbed.

As I wrote last month “Jaw Jaw is better than War War”

The body speaks its language – it informs; we must listen and act accordingly.

The runny nose of the common cold can be similar to the characteristics of Allium Cepa, but in this case it may be best to suffer the inconvenience as the discharge from the nose has a purpose – namely to eliminate the virus.

Sometimes it is best not to supress symptoms. That includes the use of over the counter remedies such as LemSip and so on. Yes, you feel better but you are hampering the healing.

Symptoms, from a homeopathic perspective, are not just an inconvenience – they point the way to cure.

They inform.

INFORMATION AND QUANTUM

Cutting edge Quantum Physics tells us that our entire universe is “informed”. Indeed, it tells us that we are “informed” – right from the moment of our birth to our last breath.

Current thinking is that the brain is a sort of transmitter / receiver, as much as a pseudo computer for processing our thoughts and bodily signals.

So, the brain may be receiving “downloads” – something like the downloads to our electronic gadgets. Fascinating.

Last night, courtesy of the Scientific and Medical Network I listened to Dr Doug Matzke talk about his research into quantum computing.

He has a new book titled “Deep Reality” – tad over my head mathematically – but the fundamental role of “information” in nature is becoming clear.

Homeopathy is information medicine, born ahead of its time.

Symptoms are key to treatment in Homeopathy just as they are in orthodox (allopathic) medicine, but the interpretation is different. Winston Churchill once said that “Jaw, Jaw is better than War, War” and I suggest that his sentiment has some relevance in the practice of medicine.

The interpretation of symptoms is dfferent in homeopathy
Sir Winston Churchill

Symptoms in Homeopathy and Allopathy

Symptoms are symptoms but the interpretation can be different.

Take a look at any text on modern drug classes and you can clearly see that modern western medicine is on a war footing.  There are anti-biotics; anti-depressants; anti-fungals; anti-inflammatories; anti-virals…just as we have anti-aircraft; anti-tank; anti-personnel and so on. 

This is “War, War”.

Clearly modern pharmaceuticals are effective, but they are not always curative in the long term.  There is quite a queue in my local chemist for repeat prescriptions ..

Most modern drugs have not been around that long, the first antibiotics only appeared in the 1930s. We tend to forget that.

Yet mankind has suffered sickness, for thousands of years…and been healed. Naturopathic and hydropathic “cures” were once the norm..at least for those who could afford it. Not that such treatments were always successful either.

Let’s be honest, symptoms are inconvenient at best, and often worse – so a magic bullet has much in its favour – especially in an impatient age.

The trouble is that the “enemy’s” protest may have virtue. Perhaps a little “jaw jaw” might bring about a longer lasting peace?

Of course to “jaw jaw” you have to understand the language. 

The Meaning of Symptoms

Symptoms are the body’s language. The attempt of the body to cure itself.

Easier then to shoot first, and ask questions later! This is suppression.

But what if the “enemy” regroups and shoots back. An uneasy truce might be the best result.

Homeopathy is “Jaw, Jaw” medicine. It is guided by the “Law of Similars” – often simplified to “like cures like”.   Homeopathically this means finding the medicine that best imitates the symptom picture.

The subject is covered in more detail in this article by the late Dr Stuart Close:

The general philosophy in homeopathy, naturopathy, and other traditional / complementary therapies is that the body tells you what it needs to cure itself.

Therefore, rather than supressing the symptoms, they should be encouraged.  A sort of swords into ploughshares approach!

Here is a simple example:

The symptoms of flu can often be helped with the Homeopathic remedy Gelsemium
Gelsemium (yellow jasmine)

Gelsemium, homeopathically prepared from a plant of the same name, has particular characteristics that come from “proving” the medicine on healthy people, knowledge of its herbal properties, clinical experience and so on.

Students of homeopathy learn the phrase “droopy, drowsy and dull”,  as the Gelsemium symptoms are just that: 

It is one of a number of medicines that have helped Covid patients – but ONLY if their symptom picture matches. The remedy stimulates an immune response that reinforces the action of the body and speeds up cure.

It is a useful remedy which you will surely find in any homeopathic first aid kit, such as shown in one of my recent blogs

*Interestingly it is said that, Gelsemium – presumably in herbal form – was once used to instil fearlessness in soldiers .  In truth this “courage” was more likely to be loss of fear through instilled apathy (what do I care if I live or die…)

I recently listened to a fascinating talk by botanist and homeopath Michal Yakir about the plants used in homeopathy today.  She recently published a magnificent book titled Wondrous Order.

Her thesis is that plant families (known as Orders) have meaning in mankind’s evolution and the application of homeopathic medicine. 

More than 50% of homeopathic medicines are of plant origin. Most of the rest originate from minerals or elements.

Dr Yakir’s Thesis about Plants in Homeopathy

Over millions of years new Orders of plant life have evolved, from simple plants like mosses and ferns, to ever more complex flowering plants.

Michel Yakir's fantastic book about plants used in homeopathy

Michal Yakir and her publishers have now produced a fabulous and beautifully illustrated book.

You can read more about Michal here: https://www.michal-yakir.de/home-en/

Michal perceives that each “Order” represents a theme in our development from infant to adult. These correlate with our psychological maturity. This is somewhat age independent. Maturity doesn’t always come with age!

Similarly within each Order sub-classes have evolved. Here Michal perceives stages of emotional and physical development. In contrast, this is generally age dependent.

A a homeopath she finds that these patterns can help her to find the best medicines for her clients. 

Symmetry

In a similar manner another well established Dutch homeopath Jan Scholten has found symmetry in the elements of the Periodic Table. These elements are the basis of the second largest class of homeopathic remedies, the minerals. He too has studied the plant kingdom https://janscholten.com/

Extraodinary work by two great minds.

Plants in Homeopathy: Examples

Let’s take a couple of examples:

Calendula or marigold a plant used in homeopathy to promote healing.  It can also be used topically in herbal form
Calendula

Calendula (Marigold), belongs to the Aster family. It has healing properties and as a herbal product it can be used as a mild antiseptic cream to heal small wounds. 

However, homeopathy considers not just the physical but also the emotional / mental. The wound doesn’t have to be physical, so (to quote Michal) a person could be “as if of a wounded person”; “don’t touch me!”

Symphytum or Comfrey a plant used in homeopathy to promote healing of fractures
Symphytum

Symphytum from the Borage family, is better known to gardeners as Comfrey, and in olden times as “bone-set” because of its use in helping broken bones to heal. 

Both the above plants are in the same plant Order (Asterideæ). In both there is a theme of avoidance of touch, of being hurt – obvious with a wound or broken bone, perhaps less so in the emotional sense. Such emotional oversensitivity might suggest an impediment to inner growth

Over the last century or so, the objectivity of science – for all its benefits – has set humankind apart from nature, rather than being a part of nature.  This is unfortunate as we are subjects not simply objective observers in the story as Michal and Jan both suggest. 

Environmental crisis, forest fires and a pandemic, should be timely reminders of our true origins. But re-discovering our roots is a challenge be it at the personal or collective level.

All a little complicated? But is it so surprising that our story depends on the plants we eat, and the minerals from which they grow. They tell our story…

Bowel Nosodes in Homeopathy are serial ultra-dilutions of bowel flora. They have a wide range of uses and not just in bowel related problems. Though almost consigned to history, modern orthodox medicine is slowly coming to the conclusion that the bio-chemistry of our guts may have wider implications. You may have heard about the microbiome?

Orthodox (Western Scientific) Medicine

So far as orthodox medicine is concerned relatively few of the treatments that were in vogue before about 1950 have much importance today. The medicine of the 19th and even the first half of the 20th century, though no doubt fascinating from a historical point of view, has been almost entirely superseded by later developments; few books go out of date as medical texts

Quote from “The Two Faces of Homeopathy” by Anthony Campbell

This comes from a book published in 1984. Given the speed of progress, today we can say that anything much before the year 2000 is medical history.

Over the last months I have watched many well qualified doctors and scientists on YouTube speaking about the Sars-Cov-2 virus and its treatment. Few scientific papers quoted date before the turn of the millenia.

Of course, it was barely a decade earlier that the information age began when British Scientist Tim Berners-Lee conceived the world-wide web in 1989. Since then, more than medical texts have gone out of date. Almost everything seems history!

Perhaps there is a hazard here? One problem is that for anything to be valid in medicine today it has to be supported by peer reviewed evidence and so forth. This tends to invalidate past wisdom, unless it is studied and rediscovered anew according to current standards. At face value, this is all well and good, but alas outcomes and conclusions are influenced despite claims of rigor and impartiality.

I truly recommend Dr Malcolm Kendrick’s book “Doctoring Data” https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/ if you wish to understand the use of data in medicine today. His blogs are excellent also.

Since writing this blog I have penned another, which you may care to read, explaining how what we now call othodox medicine came to dominate titled the History of Homeopathic Medicine.

Are we what we eat…? Dr Zach Bush thinks so.

Last month I shared with you a rather long YouTube video by Dr Zach Bush. From the same source I have now found a shorter piece (and nicely illustrated) titled Chemical Farming and the Loss of Human Health, where he reminds us of our past. Zachary draws our attention to our hubris and the short sightedness of our actions. In short, we have bought into a narrative over the last century that ignores the wisdom of past millenia.

Looking down the microsope has taught mankind many things, but however well meaning, we have – alas – lost sight of the bigger picture. This bigger picture is one of connectivity between all things in the natural world; every action has a reaction. Everything has a purpose.

Dr Bush teaches us that the quality of the soil in our fields matters. So too the soil – or le terrain (sounds classier in French!) of our gut. Both are teeming with viruses and bacteria, all of which have a purpose. In balance health results; with imbalance illness.

The Origins of the Bowel Nosodes in Homeopathy

Dr Edward Bach (1886-1936), was a bacteriologist working just before the First World War at University College Hospital London.

He observed a connection between gut bacteria and health. At the time he studied the use of bacteria in vaccine form to treat patients suffering from chronic (long term) disease.

Later when continuing his work at the Royal London Homeopathic Hospital he found that homeopathic preparations were as effective as the vaccine form. Known as the bowel nosodes they continue to be a useful tools in the medicine chest of the homeopath.

In the late 1920s Dr Bach moved on to work on the flower essences, and the Bach Rescue Remedy mixture may be familiar to you (you can buy it still at many high steet pharmacies).

The work on the bowel nosodes passed to a husband and wife team, Dr John and Elizabeth Paterson at the Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital, who by all accounts undertook meticulous research adding to the knowledge base begun by Dr Bach, up until the 1950s. Their work was then eclipsed by the advances in antibiotics.

Is it not interesting how quickly we forget?

The Bowel Nosodes and Flower Essences - areas of research for Dr Bach

I am watching an interesting YouTube clip by Dr Zach Bush https://youtu.be/f6zb5rXgRvs. I say ‘am’ because it is quite long and I am taking it in bite size chunks. Quoting from an online version of the Oxford Dictionary he observes that the definition there in of ‘nature’ is the natural world around us; something rather apart from man. Dr Bush draws our attention to the fact that man is actually fully part of nature not ‘apart’ from it. We have long tried to control the natural world, but current crises from pandemic to environmental, suggest a need to better understand our limitations. He is all for science, but points out that science is not a fixed body of knowledge. It is an ongoing endeavour.

Isle of Wight from Lepe

I took the above photo on a blowy day about a month ago. It is hard to say what early man made of such a scene, and science brings its explanation of light reflected and refracted through water droplets. Nonetheless a rainbow still makes you stop a while and watch. The scientific analysis is good but I bet many at Lepe that felt the colours a omen for better times after a tough year.

A relatively recent scientific endeavour is the micribiome. That is to say, the gut. Dr Bush tells us that our guts are full of viruses and bacteria; many billions of them in fact. The same is true of the soil, the sea and the whole of the natural world. The living world adapts to viruses and bacteria; it has done so from the beginning of time. You might wonder then about our strategies concerning SARS-Cov-2; certainly Dr Bush does.

Complementary medicine has long taken and interest in diet and hence the gut, and on that I will say a little more next time.

Due to overconsumption of de-natured food, and a lack of exercise and fresh air, many people, especially in the second half of their lives, often become caricatures of themselves … Nowadays we rarely see a really beautiful and healthy looking person … we are either too far or too thin .. or legs are swollen, our feet flat, our backs, bent, our necks stiff. We lose our hair, suffer from dental decay, headaches, flatulence, constipation and depression; we tire quickly and worst of all, many of us no longer enjoy life. Many people never feel really well“. Naturopath, Jan de Vries, from 10 Golden Rules For Good Health (2nd edition 2008)

10 Golden Rules for Good Health

Not a very welcome message, perhaps, but a well meaning one from one of the most notable Naturopaths in the UK and beyond in recent years.

Alas, he is no longer with us, but for many decades Jan de Vries had a clinic in Troon, Ayrshire and people sought his advice from near and far.

He even had a slot on Gloria Hunniford’s BBC Radio show. He worked a 90 hour week which included writing many books!

I once had a consultation and his busy clinic was like a hospital out patient dept. He was much loved and is sadly missed.

The Naturopathic approach to health is focuses on the basics, recognising that the self regulating nature of the human organism works best when treated with respect.  His five pillars to good health were nutrition, digestion, elimination, circulation and relaxation. 

The 10 Golden Rules expand on the five pillars to include such as sleep, and mental health and mental attitude. Top of the list, always, comes nutrition. He tells us that the diets of western industrialised countries – especially the USA and Europe – have changed more in the last 100-150 years, than across millennia before.

Processed foods, sugar, excess alcohol, industrial farming and so on, are not what the body needs. Instead seventy percent of our diets should be of plant origin, and raw fruits and vegetables should be an important part of daily nutrition. Medical science has also come to appreciate the relationship between a healthy immune system and a healthy gut.

Obesity seems to have become rather an epidemic these days. In the past the poor were thin, as is still the case in the developing countries but the opposite seems to be the picture in the western world. And it is the western world that has suffered the most in this Covid-19 pandemic. Food for thought?

society of Homeopaths

Disclaimer: I am a qualified professional homeopath and not a medical doctor. The NHS has many resources, and seeking the opinion of your GP is always of value.

© 2024 Allan Pollock